Kevlin Henney

Kevlin Henney

Kevlin Henney

twitter-icon@KevlinHenney

Biography

Kevlin is an independent consultant, trainer, reviewer and writer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and websites, a contributor to open source software and a member of more committees than is probably healthy. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

Session: Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of Many Programmers

Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely by imitation, and rarely question them, how do you know your habits are effective? Many of the habits that programmers have for naming, formatting, commenting and unit testing do not stand up as rational and practical on closer inspection. This talk examines seven coding habits that are not as effective as programmers believe, and suggests alternatives.

Workshop: Architecture with Agility

Every system has an architecture, whether accidental or intentional, and regardless of whether it was put in place by a nominated architect or whether it emerged from the decisions and discussions of a team.

All too often the focus of what is often described as architecture is centred around a specific set of platform technologies, which forms only one part of the set of concerns an architecture should address. And all too often architecture is seen as a separate concern from development process, whereas the two are intertwined — what you build is influenced by how you build it, and vice versa.

This workshop day looks at the relationship between agile processes and good architecture, taking in development process models, architectural styles, requirements techniques, sufficient modelling techniques, design patterns and testing practices.

Level: Beginner to intermediate.

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